Return to Headlines

Summer Reading: English III

Honors Summer Reading Assignment for English 3 (American Literature) 2021 

 

Choose 1 of the following novels to read: Educated by Tara Westover or 1776 by David McCullough (blurbs below). Complete the accompanying assignment by August 9th. Email me at tuckerg@fcsboe.org with any questions! 

******************************************************************************

 

Educated by Tara Westover 

Blurb: 

Tara Westover wasn’t your garden variety college student. When the Holocaust was mentioned in a history class, she didn’t know what it was (no, really). That’s because she didn’t see the inside of a classroom until the age of seventeen. Public education was one of the many things her religious fanatic father was dubious of, believing it a means for the government to brainwash its gullible citizens, and her mother wasn’t diligent on the homeschooling front. If it wasn’t for a brother who managed to extricate himself from their isolated—and often dangerous--world, Westover might still be in rural Idaho, trying to survive her survivalist upbringing. --Erin Kodicek, Amazon Book Review

 

Assignment:

 

  • Before You Read: The following unusual vocabulary is present in the book Educated. Before you dive into the story (I know you are excited to do so!) create a Google Slide presentation to display your knowledge of the following terms. 

 

    1. Each term needs its own slide. Each slide must contain: the vocabulary term, a definition of the term (with source cited), a sentence using the term correctly, and an image that represents the term in some way. 
      1. Terms (25)- sacrilege, palliative, caveat, subvert, coquettish, jocular, panache, proselytize, fundamentalism, supplication, gentile, repertoire, vindicate, inherent, capricious, seraphic, shibboleth, superimpose, euphemism, fatalism, visceral, dissonance, collude, hegemony, and antediluvian.

 

 

  • As You Read: As you read Educated, write a summary for each chapter on a Google Doc (1 doc for all summaries). Be sure that each summary includes the following:

 

    1. Character descriptions for any characters introduced in that chapter.
    2. All major events that happened in the chapter.
    3. 1 quote from the chapter that you believe is important, insightful, or made a connection in your mind with something else outside the story. Then, explain why you chose that quote. 
    4. Edited for correct spelling and grammar. 

 

 

  • After You Read: On a poster board, create a spider chart of ideas from this novel. The center of your chart will be the word EDUCATION. You will put words, quotes, and pictures on the chart that creates a map of what this novel taught you about the importance and consequences of education. 

 

Example: Central Topic

1776 by David McCullough 

Blurb:

In this masterful book, David McCullough tells the intensely human story of those who marched with General George Washington in the year of the Declaration of Independence—when the whole American cause was riding on their success, without which all hope for independence would have been dashed and the noble ideals of the Declaration would have amounted to little more than words on paper. Based on extensive research in both American and British archives, 1776 is a powerful drama written with extraordinary narrative vitality. It is the story of Americans in the ranks, men of every shape, size, and color, farmers, schoolteachers, shoemakers, no-accounts, and mere boys turned soldiers. And it is the story of the King’s men, the British commander, William Howe, and his highly disciplined redcoats who looked on their rebel foes with contempt and fought with a valor too little known. --Simon & Schuster, Inc



Assignment:

 

  • Before You Read: The following unusual vocabulary is present in the book 1776. Before you dive into the story (I know you are excited to do so!) create a Google Slide presentation to display your knowledge of the following terms. 

 

      1. Each term needs its own slide. Each slide must contain: the vocabulary term, a definition of the term (with source cited), a sentence using the term correctly, and an image that represents the term in some way. 
        1. Terms (25)- sovereign, loyalist, colony, Parliament, Whig, mercenaries, patriots, loggerheads, stalemate, siege, Quaker, Puritan, dysentery, perniciously, lenity, supineness,  undaunted, reconnaissance, encomium, panegyrick, cathartic, pretensions, obstreperous, harum scarum, and austere

 

  • As You Read: As you read 1776, write a summary for each chapter on a Google Doc (1 doc for all summaries). Be sure that each summary includes the following:

 

    1. Character descriptions for any characters introduced in that chapter.
    2. All major events that happened in the chapter.
    3. 1 quote from the chapter that you believe is important, insightful, or made a connection in your mind with something else outside the story. Then, explain why you chose that quote. 
    4. Edited for correct spelling and grammar. 

 

 

  • After You Read: On a poster board, create a spider chart of ideas from this novel. The center of your chart will be the word FREEDOM. You will put words, quotes, and pictures on the chart that creates a map of what this novel taught you about the importance and struggles of freedom. 

 

 

                          Example: Central Topic